Early Settlers of Deception Bay

Many early settlers contributed to the establishment of the Deception Bay area and, although it is impossible to name and acknowledge all of them, here are just some of the families who made the Bay what it is today.

It is believed that Joseph Poultney who had logged Deception Bay from the 1870s to service his Enoggera Sawmills may have influenced Alexander Clugston to settle here. Clugston selected several portions of land which he cleared and planted with orange trees. He also established the first post office in 1884 on the coastal track to Gympie where fresh water lagoons fed Saltwater Creek.

First Post Office DeceptionBayaHeritage.com

Bert Lipscombe took over the post office running it until 1905, when he became Superintendent of the Cherbourg Aboriginal reserve. His son, Percy, stayed in the area. running a dairy until the early 1970’s.

LIIPSCOMBE’S HOUSE AT DECEPTION BAY. B.J. LIPSCOMBE IS SHOWN AS BEING IN CHARGE OF DECEPTION BAY POST OFFICE IN 1905. (THESE RECORDS DISAGREE WITH AN OPINION THAT WHEN THE LIPSCOMBE FAMILY ARRIVED IN DECEPTION BAY IN 1896 THEY TOOK OVER THE POST OFFICE FROM A. CLUGSON). IN THIS EARLY PERIOD YOUNG BERT LIPSCOMBE USED TO RIDE TO NARANGBA FOR THE MAIL. REFER “FROM SPEAR & MUSKET”, p. 268.
LIIPSCOMBE’S HOUSE AT DECEPTION BAY. B.J. LIPSCOMBE IS SHOWN AS BEING IN CHARGE OF DECEPTION BAY POST OFFICE IN 1905. (THESE RECORDS DISAGREE WITH AN OPINION THAT WHEN THE LIPSCOMBE FAMILY ARRIVED IN DECEPTION BAY IN 1896 THEY TOOK OVER THE POST OFFICE FROM A. CLUGSON). IN THIS EARLY PERIOD YOUNG BERT LIPSCOMBE USED TO RIDE TO NARANGBA FOR THE MAIL. REFER “FROM SPEAR & MUSKET”, p. 268.

Fred Pedwell, who as a boy assisted Bancroft with his mosquito research, set up a farm on 532 acres of the Bancroft land when it was subdivided between 1904 and 1916. Fred was a ‘bush builder’, so-called for his use of rough timber in the houses he constructed. As a short man, a distinguishing feature of the houses he built was the low doorways. One house he built out of wood salvaged from the 1893 floods was later bought by the Tucker family.

John Tucker had worked with Poultney at his sawmill, and had holidayed in the Bay for many years before settling permanently in the early 1900’s.

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